How to Get Rid Of Oracle Archive (.Arc) Files?

13 minutes read

To get rid of Oracle archive (.arc) files, you can follow these steps:

  1. Connect to the Oracle database using a client tool or software like SQL*Plus.
  2. Check the current location of the archive files by running the following query: SELECT name FROM v$archived_log; This will display the list of archived log files and their paths.
  3. Determine the retention policy for archived log files using the following query: SHOW PARAMETER log_archive_dest_1; Note down the value of the "RETENTION" parameter. It indicates the number of hours or days the archived logs need to be retained.
  4. Use the appropriate method based on the retention policy: If the retention policy is set to a specific duration (e.g., 7 days), you can simply delete the archived log files older than the specified duration using the following query: DELETE NOPROMPT EXPIRED ARCHIVELOG ALL; If the retention policy is set to a specific number of archive logs (e.g., 100), you can use the following query to delete the archived log files beyond the retention count: DELETE NOPROMPT ARCHIVELOG UNTIL SEQUENCE ; Replace with an appropriate value based on your retention policy. For example, if the retention policy is set to 100, and you have reached sequence 200, you can delete all logs until sequence 100.
  5. After executing the appropriate query, the archived log files will be deleted from the Oracle database.


Note: It is important to ensure that you have proper backup strategies in place before deleting any archived log files, as these files are critical for database recovery in case of any data loss or system failure.

Best Oracle Books to Read in 2024

1
Oracle PL/SQL by Example (The Oracle Press Database and Data Science)

Rating is 5 out of 5

Oracle PL/SQL by Example (The Oracle Press Database and Data Science)

2
Oracle Database 12c DBA Handbook (Oracle Press)

Rating is 4.9 out of 5

Oracle Database 12c DBA Handbook (Oracle Press)

3
Oracle Database Administration: The Essential Refe: A Quick Reference for the Oracle DBA

Rating is 4.8 out of 5

Oracle Database Administration: The Essential Refe: A Quick Reference for the Oracle DBA

4
Oracle DBA Mentor: Succeeding as an Oracle Database Administrator

Rating is 4.7 out of 5

Oracle DBA Mentor: Succeeding as an Oracle Database Administrator

5
OCA Oracle Database SQL Exam Guide (Exam 1Z0-071) (Oracle Press)

Rating is 4.6 out of 5

OCA Oracle Database SQL Exam Guide (Exam 1Z0-071) (Oracle Press)

6
Oracle Database 12c SQL

Rating is 4.5 out of 5

Oracle Database 12c SQL

7
Oracle Autonomous Database in Enterprise Architecture: Utilize Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Autonomous Databases for better consolidation, automation, and security

Rating is 4.4 out of 5

Oracle Autonomous Database in Enterprise Architecture: Utilize Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Autonomous Databases for better consolidation, automation, and security


What is the role of Oracle Data Guard in managing archive (.arc) files?

Oracle Data Guard is a high availability and disaster recovery solution provided by Oracle. It helps to maintain standby databases synchronized with a primary database to minimize data loss and downtime.


Regarding archive (.arc) files, Oracle Data Guard plays a crucial role in managing them by utilizing the following features:

  1. Redo Log Shipping: Oracle Data Guard automatically transfers the generated redo logs from the primary database to the standby database. These redo logs are essential because they contain a record of all changes made to the primary database. The standby database then applies these redo logs to stay synchronized with the primary database.
  2. Archiving: Oracle Data Guard configures the standby database to automatically archive the received redo logs. This ensures that a copy of each redo log is maintained in case of a failure at the primary database. The archived redo logs are crucial for recovering and syncing the standby database in case of a failover or switchover.
  3. Apply Services: Oracle Data Guard provides apply services that automatically apply the archived redo logs to the standby database. These logs contain the transactions that were committed on the primary database. By applying the redo logs to the standby database, it ensures the standby database reflects the latest changes made on the primary database.
  4. Switchover and Failover: Oracle Data Guard facilitates the process of switching over or failing over from the primary database to the standby database in case of a planned maintenance or an unplanned outage. During this process, the archived redo logs play a vital role as they are applied to the new primary database, ensuring data consistency.


Overall, Oracle Data Guard uses archive files (.arc) to ensure data integrity and continuous synchronization between the primary and standby databases, minimizing data loss and enabling quick recovery in case of failures.


What is the significance of the LOG_ARCHIVE_FORMAT parameter in Oracle?

The LOG_ARCHIVE_FORMAT parameter in Oracle determines the naming format for archived redo log files. Archived redo log files are critical for recovering a database in scenarios such as media failure or user errors.


The significance of the LOG_ARCHIVE_FORMAT parameter lies in its ability to provide a structured and consistent naming convention for archived redo log files. By specifying the format, it ensures that the log files are organized and easy to retrieve when needed.


This parameter allows for customization of the naming format by including variables such as %s (log sequence number), %t (thread number), %r (resetlogs identifier), and others. This flexibility enables database administrators to tailor the format according to their specific requirements.


In summary, the LOG_ARCHIVE_FORMAT parameter plays a crucial role in managing and organizing archived redo log files, facilitating efficient database recovery operations.


How to switch Oracle between archive logging modes?

To switch Oracle between archive logging modes, follow these steps:

  1. Connect to Oracle database using a privileged user account (e.g., SYSDBA).
  2. Check the current archive log mode by executing the following SQL command: SELECT log_mode FROM v$database; The output will show either ARCHIVELOG or NOARCHIVELOG.
  3. If the current mode is NOARCHIVELOG and you want to switch to ARCHIVELOG mode, execute the following SQL command: SHUTDOWN IMMEDIATE; STARTUP MOUNT; ALTER DATABASE ARCHIVELOG; ALTER DATABASE OPEN; This will shut down the database, mount it, enable archive logging, and then open the database for use.
  4. If the current mode is ARCHIVELOG and you want to switch to NOARCHIVELOG mode, execute the following SQL command: SHUTDOWN IMMEDIATE; STARTUP MOUNT; ALTER DATABASE NOARCHIVELOG; ALTER DATABASE OPEN; This will shut down the database, mount it, disable archive logging, and then open the database for use.
  5. After making the necessary changes, you can check the current archive log mode again by executing the same SQL command as in step 2 to verify that the switch was successful.


What is the impact of deleting Oracle archive (.arc) files?

Deleting Oracle archive (.arc) files can have significant impacts on an Oracle database and its related operations. Here are some potential impacts:

  1. Loss of data recovery capability: Archive files contain essential data that allows for the recovery of a database in case of a failure or disaster. If these files are deleted, the ability to restore the database to a specific point in time can be severely compromised or even impossible.
  2. Incomplete backups: Archiving is a crucial part of the backup and recovery strategy. If archive files are deleted, backups taken after the deletion will be incomplete and will not contain all the necessary log files for recovery. This can lead to data inconsistencies and difficulties in restoring the database.
  3. Performance and space issues: Oracle uses archive files to store historical data changes. Deleting these files can impact database performance, as the system might need to re-create them or spend additional resources managing the sudden increase in activity. Moreover, if the archive files are deleted without proper planning, they might consume excessive storage space, leading to disk space shortages.
  4. Compliance and legal implications: Depending on regulatory requirements and industry standards, organizations may be obligated to retain data for a specific period. Deleting archive files prematurely can violate these regulations, potentially exposing the organization to legal consequences.
  5. Replication and standby database issues: Archive files are an essential component of Oracle's Data Guard and replication features. Deleting archive files can interrupt or cause delays in replicating data changes to standby databases, disrupt synchronization, and impact failover capabilities.


It is crucial to consider these impacts and exercise caution when deleting Oracle archive files. Proper planning, backup strategies, and adherence to retention policies can help mitigate potential risks.


How to clean up obsolete Oracle archive (.arc) files?

To clean up obsolete Oracle archive files (.arc), you can follow these steps:

  1. Connect to your Oracle database using a database administrator (DBA) account.
  2. Identify the location of the archive files. The location is usually specified in the LOG_ARCHIVE_DEST_n parameter in the database's parameter file (init.ora or spfile). You can also check the LOG_ARCHIVE_DEST_STATE_n parameter to confirm if archiving is enabled for the specific destination.
  3. Determine which archive files are no longer required. Typically, you should keep the most recent archive files plus any files needed for backups and restores. If you use a backup tool that relies on archive logs, consult its documentation to determine the necessary retention policy. If you have implemented a media recovery strategy, consult your recovery plan to identify the required archive files.
  4. Stop the Oracle database to ensure data consistency during the cleanup process. Use the following command as the DBA user: SQL> SHUTDOWN IMMEDIATE;
  5. Make a backup of any archive files you are going to delete to ensure data integrity in case of accidental deletions.
  6. Use a file system command (such as rm on Unix/Linux or del on Windows) to delete the identified obsolete archive files from the archive destination directory.
  7. Start the Oracle database again: SQL> STARTUP;
  8. Verify that all archived logs required for recovery are still available using the following command: SQL> SELECT sequence#, name FROM v$log WHERE archived = 'NO'; Ensure that the output does not include any archived logs which were deleted.
  9. Monitor the system to ensure that archiving is functioning correctly and that no errors are encountered.


Note: Before performing any actions that impact data or system configuration, it is highly recommended to have a backup of your database and consult with an experienced Oracle DBA to ensure the appropriate steps are taken for your specific environment.


How to automate the deletion of Oracle archive (.arc) files?

To automate the deletion of Oracle archive (.arc) files, you can create a shell script or a batch file (depending on your operating system) and schedule it using a cron job (UNIX/Linux) or a task scheduler (Windows) to run at a specific interval. Here is a basic example of how to do this:

  1. Open a text editor and create a new file.
  2. Write the following script to delete the archive files:


For UNIX/Linux:

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
#!/bin/bash

# Set the path to your archived logs directory
ARCHIVE_DIR=/path/to/archive

# Delete .arc files older than a specific number of days (e.g., 7 days)
find $ARCHIVE_DIR -name "*.arc" -type f -mtime +7 -exec rm -f {} \;


For Windows:

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
@echo off

REM Set the path to your archived logs directory
set ARCHIVE_DIR=C:\path\to\archive

REM Delete .arc files older than a specific number of days (e.g., 7 days)
forfiles /P %ARCHIVE_DIR% /S /M *.arc /D -7 /C "cmd /c del @file"


  1. Save the file with a meaningful name, such as "delete_archive_files.sh" (for UNIX/Linux) or "delete_archive_files.bat" (for Windows).
  2. Make the script executable (UNIX/Linux only): Open the terminal, navigate to the directory where you saved the script, and run the following command:
1
chmod +x delete_archive_files.sh


  1. Depending on your operating system, you can now schedule the script to run automatically:
  • For UNIX/Linux: Use the cron job scheduler by running the command crontab -e and add an entry to execute the script at the desired interval. For example, to run the script every day at 2 AM, add the following line:
1
0 2 * * * /path/to/delete_archive_files.sh


  • For Windows: Use the Task Scheduler to create a new task. Set the trigger to the desired interval and provide the path to the script in the "Action" tab.


By following these steps, the script will run automatically and delete the Oracle archive files older than the specified number of days. Make sure to adjust the ARCHIVE_DIR path and the number of days according to your requirements.

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Telegram

Related Posts:

To connect Oracle to Unix, you can follow the following steps:Firstly, ensure that Oracle client software is installed on your Unix system. This software enables communication between Oracle and Unix. Open a terminal or command prompt on your Unix system. Set ...
To set up Oracle Automatic Storage Management (ASM), you need to follow certain steps. Here's a brief overview of the process:Install Oracle Grid Infrastructure: ASM is a component of Oracle Grid Infrastructure, so start by installing Grid Infrastructure o...
To enable and disable constraints in Oracle, you can use the ALTER TABLE statement. Here is how you can do it:To enable a constraint:Open Oracle SQL Developer or any other Oracle database management tool.Connect to the Oracle database using your credentials an...