How to Structure Ember.js Web Application?

14 minutes read

Ember.js is a JavaScript framework designed for building ambitious web applications. When structuring an Ember.js web application, it is essential to follow certain conventions and best practices to ensure maintainability, scalability, and modularity of the codebase.

  1. File Structure: Ember.js follows a conventional file structure known as the "Pods" structure. This structure organizes related files together in a single directory, making it easier to locate and maintain specific components of the application.
  2. Routes: Routes define the URL structure of the application and handle the corresponding actions. Routes should be placed in the "routes" directory and follow a naming convention that correlates with the related template and controller.
  3. Templates: Templates are written in Handlebars and define how the application looks. They should be placed within the "templates" directory and follow a naming convention that matches the associated route.
  4. Controllers: Controllers handle the actions and data for a specific section of the application. They are responsible for managing the state of the application and should be placed in the "controllers" directory. Ember.js also employs a concept called "Controller-Mixin", which allows sharing common functionality between multiple controllers.
  5. Components: Components encapsulate reusable UI elements and logic. They should be placed within the "components" directory and follow a naming convention that reflects their purpose.
  6. Services: Services provide reusable functionality that can be shared across different parts of the application. They should be placed within the "services" directory and follow a naming convention that describes their purpose.
  7. Models: Models represent the data structure of the application and handle data manipulation and retrieval. They should be placed within the "models" directory and follow a naming convention that reflects their purpose.
  8. Adapters and Serializers: Adapters handle the communication with the backend API, while serializers convert data between the server and client. They should be placed within the "adapters" and "serializers" directories, respectively. Ember.js provides default adapters and serializers but allows customization as per the requirements.
  9. Helpers: Helpers are small functions that can be used within templates to perform computations or provide custom functionality. They should be placed within the "helpers" directory and named appropriately.
  10. Initializers: Initializers are used to set up and configure different parts of the application during the initialization phase. They should be placed within the "initializers" directory.


By adhering to these conventions, structuring an Ember.js web application becomes more intuitive and maintainable, making it easier for developers to collaborate and enhance the application over time.

Best Ember.js Books to Read in 2024

1
Ember.js Cookbook

Rating is 5 out of 5

Ember.js Cookbook

2
Ember.js in Action

Rating is 4.9 out of 5

Ember.js in Action

3
Building Web Apps with Ember.js: Write Ambitious JavaScript

Rating is 4.8 out of 5

Building Web Apps with Ember.js: Write Ambitious JavaScript

4
Ember.js: A Comprehensive Developer's Handbook

Rating is 4.7 out of 5

Ember.js: A Comprehensive Developer's Handbook

5
Ember.js Essentials

Rating is 4.6 out of 5

Ember.js Essentials

6
Mastering Ember.js

Rating is 4.5 out of 5

Mastering Ember.js


How to upgrade an Ember.js app to the latest version?

To upgrade an Ember.js app to the latest version, you can follow these steps:

  1. Read the Release Notes: Before upgrading, it is important to review the release notes of the version you are currently using and the version you want to upgrade to. It will provide information about breaking changes, deprecations, and important considerations for the upgrade process.
  2. Update Dependencies: Update the versions of Ember.js and its related dependencies in your app's package.json file. You can find the latest versions on the Ember.js website or on the npm registry.
  3. Run the Upgrade Tool: Ember.js provides a command-line utility called ember-cli-update that helps with the upgrade process. Install ember-cli-update globally by running the following command: npm install -g ember-cli-update
  4. Run the Upgrade Command: Navigate to your app's directory and run the following command to start the upgrade process: ember-cli-update The tool will examine your app, generate a diff of the changes required for the upgrade, and prompt you to review and confirm the changes. It may also detect and suggest solutions for potential compatibility issues.
  5. Review and Resolve Conflicts: Manually inspect the changes suggested by the tool and resolve any conflicts or updates required in your app's code. This step may involve updating deprecated methods, adjusting component invocations, resolving changes in the build pipeline, etc.
  6. Test and Verify: After resolving conflicts, run your tests or manually test your app to ensure that it functions correctly with the upgraded Ember.js version. Pay attention to any deprecation warnings or error messages that may appear in the console.
  7. Update Deprecations: Make sure to address any deprecations identified during the upgrade process. Ember.js provides extensive documentation on handling deprecations, so refer to the official guides or official Ember.js website for guidance on fixing them.
  8. Iterate and Repeat: Repeat the above steps until your app successfully runs without errors or deprecation warnings.
  9. Update Addons and Dependencies: Review the release notes of any Ember addons or other dependencies your app uses. Update their versions accordingly and ensure they are compatible with the upgraded Ember.js version.
  10. Retest and Deploy: After completing the upgrade process, thoroughly retest your app to ensure its functionality and performance. Once you are confident that your app works as expected, you can deploy it to your production environment.


Note: Upgrading an Ember.js app can be a complex process, especially if there are significant changes between the versions. It is recommended to have good test coverage and/or create a backup of your app before starting the upgrade process.


What is Ember.js testing and how to write unit tests?

Ember.js testing is the process of writing tests for the Ember.js framework to ensure the proper functioning of its components and features. Unit testing is a specific type of testing that focuses on testing individual units or pieces of code in isolation, typically at the function level.


To write unit tests in Ember.js, you can follow these steps:

  1. Set up your testing environment: Ember.js uses the Ember Testing framework, which includes a testing runtime and helpers. Make sure you have the necessary testing dependencies installed.
  2. Create a new test file: In your Ember.js project's tests directory, create a new test file for the unit test you want to write. For example, if you want to test a component named my-component, you can create a file called my-component-test.js.
  3. Write the test: In the test file, import the necessary dependencies and define a test case using the module and test functions provided by Ember.js. Inside the test case, you can use the assert object to define assertions and verify the expected behavior of the unit you're testing. For example:
 1
 2
 3
 4
 5
 6
 7
 8
 9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
import { module, test } from 'qunit';
import { setupTest } from 'ember-qunit';

module('Unit | Component | my-component', function(hooks) {
  setupTest(hooks);

  test('it renders correctly', function(assert) {
    // Arrange
    const component = this.owner.factoryFor('component:my-component').create();

    // Act
    component.set('someProperty', 'hello');
    const result = component.get('someProperty');

    // Assert
    assert.equal(result, 'hello', 'it sets and gets the property correctly');
  });
});


  1. Run the test: In your command-line interface, navigate to your Ember.js project's directory and run the test command. For example, using ember-cli, you can run ember test to execute all test files.


Ember.js also provides additional types of tests, such as integration tests and acceptance tests, which allow you to test the interaction between different components or simulate user interactions. The testing tools and techniques may vary based on your Ember.js version and chosen testing framework, so it's recommended to refer to the official Ember.js testing documentation for more detailed instructions and examples.


What is the Ember.js computed property and how to use it?

Ember.js computed properties are a way to dynamically update a property based on other properties. They allow you to define a property that is computed on the fly, based on the values of other properties.


To define a computed property in Ember.js, you can use the computed function provided by Ember:

 1
 2
 3
 4
 5
 6
 7
 8
 9
10
11
12
import { computed } from '@ember/object';

const obj = Ember.Object.extend({
  firstName: 'John',
  lastName: 'Doe',
  fullName: computed('firstName', 'lastName', function() {
    return `${this.get('firstName')} ${this.get('lastName')}`;
  })
});

const person = obj.create();
console.log(person.get('fullName')); // Output: "John Doe"


In the example above, the fullName property is defined as a computed property. It depends on the values of firstName and lastName properties. Whenever either of these properties changes, the fullName property will automatically be updated.


Computed properties are lazy by default, meaning they won't be computed until they are accessed for the first time. Once computed, the result is cached, until one of the dependent properties change, triggering a re-computation.


Computed properties can also be used to set values. For example:

 1
 2
 3
 4
 5
 6
 7
 8
 9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
const obj = Ember.Object.extend({
  fullName: '',
  firstName: '',
  lastName: '',
  setFullName: computed('firstName', 'lastName', {
    get() {
      return `${this.get('firstName')} ${this.get('lastName')}`;
    },
    set(key, value) {
      let [firstName, lastName] = value.split(' ');
      this.setProperties({
        firstName,
        lastName
      });
      return value;
    }
  })
});


In the above example, the setFullName computed property acts as a property setter. When you set the fullName property, it will automatically split the value and update firstName and lastName accordingly.


Overall, computed properties are a powerful feature in Ember.js that allow you to easily define dependent properties and perform calculations based on those dependencies, while keeping your code concise and maintainable.


What is the Ember.js run loop and how does it work?

The Ember.js run loop is a mechanism provided by the framework to control the flow of asynchronous operations and ensure proper synchronization of state changes before updating the user interface.


In Ember.js, the run loop manages and executes tasks in a specific order to avoid inconsistencies caused by asynchronous code. It can be thought of as a loop that processes a queue of tasks in phases.


Here's how the Ember.js run loop works:

  1. Task Registration: When an asynchronous operation, such as an AJAX request or an event listener, is triggered within an Ember.js application, the associated callback or promise is registered with the run loop.
  2. Task Queueing: Registered tasks are added to the run loop's task queue. Multiple tasks may be enqueued during a single iteration of the loop.
  3. Loop Execution: The run loop proceeds to execute the tasks in the task queue, one at a time, following a specific order of phases. a. Sync Phase: In this phase, any synchronous tasks, like computed property recalculations or bindings, are executed. b. Render Phase: The render phase updates the DOM with any pending changes, like re-rendering components or updating UI controls. c. Apply Phase: In this phase, property changes made during the previous phases are applied to the actual objects in the Ember.js app. d. Async Phase: During this phase, any remaining asynchronous tasks that were registered after the sync phase began are executed. This helps prevent additional synchronous tasks from being introduced after asynchronous operations have started. e. Repeat: The loop starts again from the sync phase and continues until the task queue is empty.
  4. Completion: Once all tasks in the loop have been executed, the loop will exit, and the application will be in a synchronized state.


By using the Ember.js run loop, you can ensure that changes to the application's state are properly propagated to the UI, preventing potential race conditions or inconsistencies.


What is the Ember.js router and how does it work?

The Ember.js router is a powerful feature that helps in managing the application's routes and URL scheme. It allows developers to define and organize routes, map them to corresponding templates and actions, and handle the transitions between different application states.


The router in Ember.js follows the convention-over-configuration principle, meaning that it uses sensible defaults based on conventions but also provides flexibility for customization. When a user interacts with the application, such as entering a URL or clicking a link, the router maps the requested URL to a specific route. This triggers a series of actions, including loading the associated model data, rendering the appropriate template, and updating the URL.


Here's a step-by-step overview of how the Ember.js router works:

  1. Initialization: The router is defined as a subclass of Ember's Router class. It is registered within the application's namespace and associated with a root URL (e.g., /).
  2. Route Mapping: Developers define routes by configuring the router's map() method. Routes can be defined as resource routes (representing a model) or route routes (representing a state).
  3. URL Handling: When a user enters a URL or clicks a link, the router intercepts it and maps it to the corresponding route. It parses the URL and identifies the appropriate route based on the defined mappings.
  4. Model Loading: If the route includes a model hook, the router triggers it, allowing developers to load data from a server or make other necessary preparations. The resolved model is then made available to the associated route.
  5. Rendering Template: The router looks for the corresponding template associated with the route and renders it into the application's main outlet or specified named outlets. The template is populated with the data from the model.
  6. URL Updating: When transitioning between routes, the router automatically updates the URL to reflect the new application state. This makes the application state bookmarkable and allows users to share URLs.
  7. Actions and Hooks: The router provides hooks, such as beforeModel, afterModel, and activate, to perform additional actions during the route transition process. Developers can define custom actions to handle events or perform specific tasks.


The Ember.js router simplifies the process of building complex applications with multiple routes and states. It provides an organized structure and helps in decoupling the application's logic from the URL scheme, making it easier to maintain and modify.

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Telegram

Related Posts:

To load parts of Ember.js on demand, you can use Ember's built-in module system along with the import statement. Here's how you can achieve this:Identify the parts of Ember.js that you want to load on demand. These can be components, routes, models, or...
To create a login form using Ember.js, follow these steps:Start by setting up a new Ember.js project or navigating to an existing one. Create a new route for the login page. In your project's app/router.js file, add a new route for the login page using the...
In Ember.js, referencing a clicked object can be done by using the action helper along with a function defined in the component or controller that handles the click event.First, ensure that the object you want to reference in the click event is available in th...